Rare Nirvana photographs from the 1991 concert for sale as NFT

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On October 1, 1999, seven days after the release of the band’s breakthrough album It does not matter, Nirvana played a concert at JC Dobbs in Philadelphia. There was a buzz surrounding the show, and in the audience, photographer Faith West was ready to capture the night.

“At the club that night, the air was charged with anticipation,” photographer West recalled in a statement. “There was a buzz of excitement that said something great was about to happen. Plus, there was a sense of joy emanating from [Kurt] Cobain in his raucous guitar strokes and the transcendent desire of his voice.

For more than 28 decades, the photographs taken by West from that night have never been seen and should be sold as NFT via Pop legend on February 20 on what would have been Cobain’s 55th birthday.

Available for purchase from Pop Legendz are four one-of-a-kind NFTs made from 10 never-before-seen images, which will be auctioned with bids starting at 67 Ethereum, which is currently valued at $250,000, for the GIF artworks. Buyers will also receive a framed 16″ x 24″ fine art print of an image, signed by the photographer.

In addition to the four pieces, 10 images that make up the artwork will be auctioned individually as NFTs, in both black and white and acid wash color versions.

Additional items include the “Nirvana Fan Club”, a sale of GIF artwork as NFTs limited to 150 pieces that were created from four images, at $499, in addition to another 150 copies of each of 17 stills for $99. each, also available in black and white and acid wash color.

Half of all revenue from both sales will benefit The Trevor Project, a nonprofit that helps at-risk LGBTQ+ youth, while another portion of proceeds will benefit Alternatives to the network, an organization bringing solar power to low-income families.

“I can still hear the fuzzy guitar echo,” West says, “and feel the energy in the room, when I remember it now, three decades later.”

Photo: Faith West/Pop Legendz

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